I don’t see PaidViewpoint on your list. I like using that site. I signed up for it on June 28, 2016, but I guess I forgot about the site and stopped using it on July 24, 2016 but had a total of $1.91. I started using it again on May 5, 2018, and I’m now up to $27.05 and have a trait score of 10, which is the highest. The surveys are easy and you don’t get disqualified. I mostly earn 10 cents, but once in awhile I earn some good money like 62 cents. It does take awhile to add up, but it’s free money.
Post-recession, a lot of workers started looking for ways to earn extra cash. While most side gigs won’t supplant the steady cashflow of a regular job, they can pad a paycheck that hasn’t seen a significant boost in a few years. Paid surveys are often mentioned as one way to earn a few extra dollars fast. But are paid surveys a legitimate way to make money – or are they scams? The answer is that it depends on the survey and the company you are taking them for.
There are also many questionable "middleman" third-party paid survey sites that hype easy money for participating in online marketing research from home. Here, the old adage is true: if it sounds too good to be true, it usually is. Further, it’s worth knowing that there’s a lot of competition among these companies for your participation – which means potential for exaggeration, at the very least, if not outright scams.
And lastly, let's discuss privacy.  In some ways, Pinecone Research gets it right – they use the information to verify you are not a duplicate or in any way defrauding them out of a valuable opinion.  After that, they only use your personal information for developing metrics and usage statistics – not giving it out to every third party that comes along.  More importantly, they take consumer information privacy seriously.  When they compile their reports for their clients, they scrub all data of any identifying information.
Watching video ads: Video ads certainly aren't uncommon in the online world. While generally they're a hassle getting in the way of the content you want to watch, many paid survey sites have turned them into a way for members to make money. It's pretty easy to make a tab, set a playlist of paid ads going, mute it, and carry on with browsing the internet or taking surveys.
While it might be hard to believe at first, American Consumer Opinion will pay you real, actual money to share your opinions and complete online surveys. Once you join their online opinion panel, you’ll be asked to offer opinions on new products you have tried, test out new advertising campaigns, and tell companies what you think of their marketing techniques and slogans.
One Poll is a company that was founded in the United Kingdom, but it’s also open to consumers in the United States and beyond. It claims to be recognized by Money Saving Expert, one of the largest consumer websites in that country, which is a reassuring recommendation. What I recognized about it is that the surveys are short and easy to complete, so ideal if you’ve had a hard day and don’t want to do anything too taxing. New surveys are added on a daily basis, and some are amusingly quirky.
And lastly, let's discuss privacy.  In some ways, Pinecone Research gets it right – they use the information to verify you are not a duplicate or in any way defrauding them out of a valuable opinion.  After that, they only use your personal information for developing metrics and usage statistics – not giving it out to every third party that comes along.  More importantly, they take consumer information privacy seriously.  When they compile their reports for their clients, they scrub all data of any identifying information.
“I participated in an in-home product trial study. A coffee machine company sent me one of the coffee makers along with about 200 coffee pods. I received $7 for completing 3 short surveys. Plus, after the study, the company said I could keep the coffee maker. So, I got like 4 mos of coffee for everyone in my household, a free coffee maker and $7!” - David W.
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